Are You Ready for the End of the Flash Browser Plug-In in 2020?

Filed under: Web — Simon Walklate

The end is nigh

It’s been on the cards for a number of years now, with Adobe essentially giving up on getting the Flash plug-in onto mobile devices some time ago and embracing HTML5. In fact it seems like forever since we’ve created any Flash based content for the web. But now the deadline of the end of 2020 has been announced. After this date Flash content will cease to work in the web browser.

The ‘Build It and They Will Come’ Approach to Branded Games

Filed under: Branded Games — Simon Walklate

Branded games can be a great way to get huge exposure for brands, when integrated with your other marketing. The problem that I see more often than you would think (and I would like) is businesses insisting on taking the ‘build it and they will come’ approach, despite being strongly advised against it.

Things Every Brand Should Do With Their Branded Game

Filed under: Branded Games — Simon Walklate

Branded games really are the king of premium content that can help engage your audience, give your PR the hook it needs to get coverage in online and traditional media, help your SEO efforts and more. But like with any content, it can be the most amazing piece ever created, but if few people know it’s there, it will fail.

Without a promotion strategy to drive a good number of players in the first instance, you’re fighting an uphill battle and will likely be disappointed with the results. On the other hand a good strategy, implemented well, can produce great results. But it does require some work, above and beyond the production.

HTML5 vs Apps for Branded Mobile Games

Filed under: Branded Games — Simon Walklate

Now that we are well into the age of mobile and businesses, marketers and content creators are more often than not putting mobile first, one of the biggest dilemmas is how best to deploy branded content to make it accessible to mobile devices. This is especially true of branded games.

The two main choices boil down to either using HTML5 or making it downloadable and installable as a standalone application via mobile app stores. Each have a great number of pros and cons and it’s important to be aware of the implications of choosing one over the other, when planning a new project.

Controls – A Huge Problem With Mobile Game Design

Filed under: Game Design — Simon Walklate

I know some would say we’re just conditioned to expect a mouse and keyboard combo, or a gamepad when playing games and it just requires thinking outside the box. But there’s no doubt about it, a lack of any sort of meaningful input device on mobile devices is a huge barrier in mobile game design. We’re only offered a very basic, imprecise input device. This basically boils mobile game controls down to prodding or swiping with a finger or tilting the device, making it difficult to implement many of the traditional genres we know and love.